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Dr. Lucia Kim and Associates
Optometrists
8763 Bayview Ave.
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 3V1

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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Exams » Common Tests » Snellen Chart

Snellen Chart

Hopefully by now, we’ve all seen one. The projected or wall-mounted Snellen eye chart, usually topped by the big letter “E”, is a common visual acuity test used to measure your sharpness of vision at multiple distances.

Arranged as a pyramid of sorts, the letters in the Snellen chart are specifically chosen and arranged to test your sharpness and clarity of vision at a baseline distance of 20 feet. During a visual acuity test, the Snellen eye chart is viewed as a projection, or mounted on a wall.

Handheld versions of Snellen charts are used for testing near vision as well.

By viewing or reading each line from top to bottom (with one eye covered at a time), your eye doctor can gain a general approximation of the quality of your visual acuity, or sharpness. Where a line of characters begin to become difficult to see is the approximate measurement of your vision.

The Snellen chart serves as a beginning—not an end—to a comprehensive eye examination.

What does “20/20” vision mean?

Snellen charts help to determine a baseline for your vision in each eye—a baseline typically measured against “20/20” vision. This means when you are 20 feet away from an object, you can comfortably see details that most people with normal vision can also see at 20 feet distance.

If you have 20/30 vision, that means what you see comfortably at 20 feet, can be seen by a person with “normal” vision at 30 feet. Your vision is weaker, in other words.

Conversely? In the rare instances where vision may test better than normal on a Snellen chart, a value of 20/10 vision means that you can see clearly from a distance of 20 feet, what a person with normal vision sees well at a distance of 10 feet. Make sense?

In fact, if you look closely at a Snellen eye chart, you’ll see the vision values associated with measuring your vision on the right or left side of each line of characters.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Dear Patients:

I am writing a letter to you about an eye care crisis in the province of Ontario after 30 years of neglect by the government of Ontario.

Since 1989, optometrists are getting the same reimbursements for the OHIP-covered eye exam-$45.

Remember-in 1989, the minimum wage was $5 an hour and now 32 years later, the minimum wage is $15 an hour. A chocolate bar in 1989 was 40 cents and now it is about $1.25. Most goods and services have increased by at least 3-fold.

The Ontario government has not adjusted our fees to inflation for 30 years but our expenses (rent, utilities, wages, etc.) have gone up 3-fold.

Can you understand our frustration?

This is not sustainable. Ultimately, patient care will suffer. With the expected ongoing restrictions due to COVID 19, many practices will be forced to shut down because we cannot cover the costs of running our practices.

Therefore, optometrists have voted to withdraw all OHIP services on September 1, 2021 to protest 30 years of Ontario government neglect and disrespect.

This job action will force the government to start negotiating fairly with us. If you support our action, please:

  1. Go to www.saveeyecare.ca and sign the online petition.
  2. Contact the Minister of Health, the Hon. Christine Elliott 416-327-4100.

Thank you and I hope I can count on your support.

Sincerely, Lucia Kim Optometrist

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We are now able to bill your insurance provider directly.