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Dr. Lucia Kim and Associates
Optometrists
8763 Bayview Ave.
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 3V1

Call (905) 764-2020
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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Diseases » Macular Degeneration » Forms of Macular Degeneration

Forms of Macular Degeneration

There are two forms of macular degeneration, dry (non-neovascular) or wet (neovascular). The term neovascular refers to the growth of new blood vessels.

Dry AMD (non-neovascular)

Dry AMD is the most common form of the disease, making up about 85%-90% of all cases of AMD. It is characterized by blurred central vision or blind spots, as the macula begins to deteriorate. Dry AMD is an early stage of the disease and is less severe than the wet form,.

Dry AMD occurs when the aging tissues of the macula begin to thin out and break down. Tiny pieces of white or yellowish protein called drusen begin to appear, which are thought to be deposits from the macular tissue as it deteriorates. The appearance of these drusen are often what leads to a diagnosis of AMD during an eye exam.

With dry AMD vision loss happens gradually, however, the dry form can progress to wet AMD rapidly. There is currently no cure for dry AMD, however there is research that shows that some people can benefit from supplemental vitamin therapy including antioxidants, lutein and zeaxanthin.

Wet AMD (neovascular)

Wet AMD is less common occurring in only about 10 percent of those with AMD. AMD is classified as Wet AMD when abnormal blood vessels begin to grow under the retina and leak fluid and blood into the macula, resulting in blind spots and a loss of central vision. Wet AMD can cause more damage to vision and permanent scarring if not treated quickly, so any sudden blur in vision should be assessed immediately, especially if one is aware that they have AMD. Usually vision loss happens faster and is more noticeable than in dry AMD so the quicker it is treated, the more vision you can preserve.

Dear Patients:

I am writing a letter to you about an eye care crisis in the province of Ontario after 30 years of neglect by the government of Ontario.

Since 1989, optometrists are getting the same reimbursements for the OHIP-covered eye exam-$45.

Remember-in 1989, the minimum wage was $5 an hour and now 32 years later, the minimum wage is $15 an hour. A chocolate bar in 1989 was 40 cents and now it is about $1.25. Most goods and services have increased by at least 3-fold.

The Ontario government has not adjusted our fees to inflation for 30 years but our expenses (rent, utilities, wages, etc.) have gone up 3-fold.

Can you understand our frustration?

This is not sustainable. Ultimately, patient care will suffer. With the expected ongoing restrictions due to COVID 19, many practices will be forced to shut down because we cannot cover the costs of running our practices.

Therefore, optometrists have voted to withdraw all OHIP services on September 1, 2021 to protest 30 years of Ontario government neglect and disrespect.

This job action will force the government to start negotiating fairly with us. If you support our action, please:

  1. Go to www.saveeyecare.ca and sign the online petition.
  2. Contact the Minister of Health, the Hon. Christine Elliott 416-327-4100.

Thank you and I hope I can count on your support.

Sincerely, Lucia Kim Optometrist

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We are now able to bill your insurance provider directly.