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Dr. Lucia Kim and Associates
Optometrists
8763 Bayview Ave.
Richmond Hill, ON L4B 3V1

Call (905) 764-2020
Request an Appointment
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Bifocal Lenses

Sometimes our vision fails us at two or even three distinct distances, especially as we age. Bifocal lenses—lenses with two distinct viewing areas—have traditionally been a reliable solution to such a dilemma. (A lens with three distinct viewing areas is called a trifocal.)

By distinct, we mean there are noticeable lines separating the two different fields of vision within a bifocal lens surface. A slight adjustment to the angle of the head allows wearers to choose which lens area to look through based on the distance of the object they’re trying to see.

A farsighted person who also has trouble reading may be prescribed a pair of bifocal reading glasses, for example. The upper section of the lens would correct difficulties seeing objects at distance, and the lower section would assist in reading. (Bifocal glasses date back to the days of Benjamin Franklin!)

While wearers quickly adjust to the line separating the multiple vision fields, it is a noticeable distraction within the lens itself. This line can be eliminated using a newer lens technology called progressive lenses.

Progressive lenses incorporate two, three, or more fields of vision within a single lens without noticeable lens lines. Bifocal, trifocal and progressive lenses are all considered “multi-focal” lenses—lenses that provide correction to multiple vision problems.

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Dear Patients:

I am writing a letter to you about an eye care crisis in the province of Ontario after 30 years of neglect by the government of Ontario.

Since 1989, optometrists are getting the same reimbursements for the OHIP-covered eye exam-$45.

Remember-in 1989, the minimum wage was $5 an hour and now 32 years later, the minimum wage is $15 an hour. A chocolate bar in 1989 was 40 cents and now it is about $1.25. Most goods and services have increased by at least 3-fold.

The Ontario government has not adjusted our fees to inflation for 30 years but our expenses (rent, utilities, wages, etc.) have gone up 3-fold.

Can you understand our frustration?

This is not sustainable. Ultimately, patient care will suffer. With the expected ongoing restrictions due to COVID 19, many practices will be forced to shut down because we cannot cover the costs of running our practices.

Therefore, optometrists have voted to withdraw all OHIP services on September 1, 2021 to protest 30 years of Ontario government neglect and disrespect.

This job action will force the government to start negotiating fairly with us. If you support our action, please:

  1. Go to www.saveeyecare.ca and sign the online petition.
  2. Contact the Minister of Health, the Hon. Christine Elliott 416-327-4100.

Thank you and I hope I can count on your support.

Sincerely, Lucia Kim Optometrist

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We are now able to bill your insurance provider directly.